To Believe in What is Right and What is Not: Beyond the Boundary (OWLS Blog Tour)

Hello and welcome to this month’s OWLS blog post! It’s been a while since I’ve written a post about anime, so let’s see how this turns out today.

OWLS??

For all those of you who don’t know who OWLS are, we are a group of anibloggers who strive to promote self respect and acceptance. To know more about OWLS, visit the official site.

The tragedy at Kyoto Animations had hit us all hard. In a way of showing our love and support to KyoAni, this month’s OWLS topic has been dedicated to how their shows and productions have impacted our lives.

Just yesterday, Lita-san from Lita Kino Anime Corner gave an amazing take on the topic, so be sure to check her post out first.

Let’s go over to the prompt.

BELIEF (August Prompt)

Kyoto Animation. We all have that one anime we enjoyed from Kyoto Animation. Whether it is pain or joy, Kyoto Animation has brought to life stories that can touch our emotions. For the month of August, we will be honouring Kyoto Animation and all it has done for art, storytelling, and popular culture by discussing some of our favorite Kyoto Animation series. We will discuss what we love about these series and what they taught us. 
The fire that happened at the studio is indeed a tragedy. We pray for the lives that were lost in this tragedy and the families that are suffering at this time. Fires may be dangerous, but there are flames that burn within us that spark passion, hope, and belief in ourselves.

OWLS Bloggers

Beyond The Boundary

Around five years ago, I had found myself alone in my grandparents’ house with nothing to do and nothing to talk about. All my cousins were to come the next day, and my grandparents had been busy with talking to their neighbours at that point of time.

It was at this point, I turned on the television, resigned to watch some humorless movie listlessly. In a place where anime wasn’t played on television and manga wasn’t sold in hard copies, you can imagine my utter surprise and delight to find a cute looking bespectacled anime girl as I browsed the channels.

Kawai-chan!

However, I ended up watching the last episode of the anime three days consecutively as they had replayed it all three days I was there.
When I got back home, I decided that I wanted to know what the story was about, the intriguing powers, cast and creatures.

But when I watched Beyond the Boundary: Kako Hen (the summary of the anime series), I was quite disappointed at how bad the flow was. I couldn’t help but find that the humour was forced, characters pushed too fast, complaints, complaints, complaints.

Yet the plot line had grasped my curiosity, and I kept wondering that the characters had a certain charm to them.

So I went ahead and watched Beyond the Boundary: Mirai Hen. And realised that Kako Hen was just a recap, the type we find at the start of episodes, only an hour long.

Of Memories, Of Unveiling and Of Recovery

*contains spoilers*

Mirai Hen, on the other hand, delved into a more psychological take of one of the tropes I hate the most: Amnesia.

Memory loss really annoys me. Stories have taken advantage of that trope, abused it, harassed it, and tortured it to a point of no return. In fact, it’s a trope that annoys me even more than useless female leads (and that’s saying something).
On realising that this movie was going to be about memory loss, I had started it with low expectations, but was pleasantly surprised yet again.

Mirai Hen addresses a question that I had more often than not about amnesia- Isn’t it better to not know your past, especially when there was so much that hurts you there?

Mirai had been used by the society she was born into, even while being shunned due to the family she was from. And now that she was rid of the burden of being a hunter, and had a real shot at living the normal life she had so wished for, was it not better to allow her to do so?
But as the plot further progresses, her friends are forced to reveal her past, both hurting and helping her at the same time.

The story progresses into dealing with the action the anime was so appreciated for, and the confronting of the antagonists.

What It Means To Believe

I didn’t go much into the actual plot of the movie, for the very simple reason that the part that resonated with me was actually the question about what was right and what was wrong.

Whose belief was stronger? Her friends belief that her hopes before she lost her memory were what would truly make her happy over themselves? Or her belief that her right to know what her past was?

Questions are a way of contemplating the world around us, and our beliefs in it.

While Beyond the Boundary was a movie with no particular plot twists or unexpected revelations, it was also a perfect example of cliches well done.
I wasn’t a fan of the amnesia, and I was displeased at the over connectivity that made the whole premise seem forced, but Beyond the Boundary has a special place in my heart.

Memories of sitting in my grandfather’s house watching the same scene thrice, trying to make head and tail of the last episode of an anime I’d never seen, and then later contemplating about beliefs and what is right and wrong.
The movie for me, is two overlapping memories of myself, in two different places and a deep, resounding belief in what was and what could be.


Next on the OWLS blog tour is Fred-san from over at Au Natural. Keep an eye out for the same!

Once again, thank you for reading!
Not to sound whiny, but I’ve been highly displeased at how my writing has been these days. So an even bigger thank you for reading.
Have a great day~
#PrayForKyoAni

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3 thoughts on “To Believe in What is Right and What is Not: Beyond the Boundary (OWLS Blog Tour)

  1. This anime was on sale in the Sentai Filmworks summer sale and I regret not getting it. I didn’t think amnesia would be the theme of the anime. I never thought that maybe not knowing your past would either be a good or bad thing. Still, awesome choice!

    Liked by 1 person

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